Is Random Generosity Worth It?

Are you a generous person?  Sure, we give to causes and charities that we love that do great things in the world. But what about everyday people? Would you pay for someone’s gas or buy them groceries? Or give them money because they needed it?

This situation happened to my Mom and me on Friday night in our local Walmart. We were approached by an older black woman who said she was raising her three grandchildren and needed to come up with $25 for them to stay in their motel room another night.

It was bitterly cold and raining, so there was no way we were going to let this happen. We went and picked up what we needed, got her the money she needed and gave it to her. From there, I watched her walk out the door and disappear.

Now, some people would worry about her spending that money on drugs or alcohol which I totally understand. It can be hard to know someone’s true motives. Some people would say we probably got conned. But that’s okay. Why?

Because we have a motto in our house. If we give money to someone and they use it for fraudulent purposes and not what they told us they needed it for, that is on them. They have to answer for it later. We are happy to give if we have it and let it go.

Our world is too cold and complicated to over analyze things, help someone if you can and move on. You never know when you are indeed making a difference. A random act of kindness can mean the world to someone.

There is an excellent web site that just started earlier this month called Same Journey. Their mission is to encourage more random acts of kindness in the world. Take a look and be inspired to make a difference in our world today.

Carrie Lowrance is a writer and author. Her work has been featured on Huffington Post, The Penny Hoarder, Crosswalk, and Same Journey. She is also the author of two children’s books, Don’t Eat Your Boogers (You’ll Turn Green) and Brock’s Bad Temper (And The Time Machine). You can find out more about Carrie and her writing at carrielowrance.com

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